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Movie & Book : A Clockwork Orange 1971

Updated: Mar 13, 2021

Hanging with my Droogs

The ultimate teenage boy story for my generation was A Clockwork Orange & all of us read the book & of course saw the Stanley Kubrick movie. We couldn't get enough of the ultra-violence that these droogs got up to they were the quintessential group of troublemakers of our time. What adventures these boys got up to was just so scandalous & down right naughty to read between the pages of this fine literature of our times. Stanley made a most amazing film & followed the tellings of the book so beautifully & the two went hand in hand like great movie making should do. The language of Nadsat crept into our vocabulary & anyone reading or seeing A Clockwork Orange knew what it was all about. Alex & his Droogs are the ultimate bad boy gang of my GenerationX but we would never follow their shenanigans only read & dream of the mischief they got into.

A Clockwork Orange is a dystopiansatiricalblack comedy novel by English writer Anthony Burgess, published in 1962. It is set in a near-future society that has a youth subculture of extreme violence. The teenage protagonist, Alex, narrates his violent exploits and his experiences with state authorities intent on reforming him.

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film adapted, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on Anthony Burgess's 1962 novel of the same name. It employs disturbing, violent images to comment on psychiatry, juvenile delinquency, youth gangs, and other social, political & economic subjects in a dystopian near-future Britain.

Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the central character, is a charismatic, antisocial delinquent whose interests include classical music(especially Beethoven), committing rape, theft & what is termed "ultra-violence". He leads a small gang of thugs, Pete (Michael Tarn), Georgie (James Marcus) & Dim (Warren Clarke), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian word друг, "friend", "buddy"). The film chronicles the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture & attempted rehabilitation via an experimental psychological conditioning technique (the "Ludovico Technique") promoted by the Minister of the Interior (Anthony Sharp). Alex narrates most of the film in Nadsat, a fractured adolescent slang composed of Slavic (especially Russian), English, and Cockney rhyming slang. (Wikipedia text)


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